Healthcare Perspectives - Child Bearing & Pedagogy

The term midwife, meaning "with a woman," was first recorded in 1300. However, midwifery is probably the oldest profession known to humankind. Practitioners of midwifery are known as midwives, a term used in reference to both women and men. The more the scientific method is used to analyze birth and the use of technology during pregnancy and delivery, the more the midwifery model stands out as an enduring institution for normal pregnancy and birth

Midwives are recognized professionals that work in partnership with women and their families to give the necessary support, provide care and advice during pregnancy, assist in labor and the postpartum period, conduct births under the midwife's responsibility and provide ongoing care for the newborn and the infant after birth. This comprehensive care includes preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures. Midwives are also primary care givers providing general women's health care and may practice in any setting including in the home, the community, hospitals, clinics or health units

There are two main divisions of modern midwifery: nurse-midwives and direct-entry midwives

Nurse-midwives are advanced practice nurses who have specialized in the practice of obstetrical and gynecological care of relatively healthy women. Many registered nurse-midwives have a master's degree in nursing. Nurse-midwives practice in hospitals and medical clinics, and may also deliver in birth centers and at home. They are able to prescribe medications. Nurse-midwives provide care to women from puberty through menopause and may work closely with obstetricians who provide consultation and assistance in births which develop complications. Women with high risk pregnancies can receive the benefits of midwifery care from a nurse-midwife in collaboration with a physician

Direct-entry midwives learn midwifery through self-study, apprenticeship, a midwifery school, or a college or university-based program that does not require nurse certification. A direct-entry midwife is trained to provide the “Midwives Model of Care” to healthy women and newborns throughout the childbearing cycle primarily in out-of-hospital settings

Throughout history the care of women during childbirth was originally in the hands of women and midwives, but in the 16th century physicians grew interested in the process due to the growing field of the medical sciences and the cultural awareness of lives lost due to complications during child birth. Of special significance was the invention of the delivery forceps by Peter Chamberlen in the 17th century and the introduction of anesthesia in the 19th century. The adoption of antiseptic methods according to the theories of Joseph Lister and Ignaz Semmelweis reduced the incidence of infection in childbirth and made possible successful cesarean section. As the medical sciences evolved, so did what has become modern Obstetrics.

Throughout history the care of women during childbirth was originally in the hands of women and midwives, but in the 16th century physicians grew interested in the process due to the growing field of the medical sciences and the cultural awareness of lives lost due to complications during child birth. Of special significance was the invention of the delivery forceps by Peter Chamberlen in the 17th century and the introduction of anesthesia in the 19th century. The adoption of antiseptic methods according to the theories of Joseph Lister and Ignaz Semmelweis reduced the incidence of infection in childbirth and made possible successful cesarean section. As the medical sciences evolved, so did what has become modern Obstetrics

Obstetrics (from the Latin obstare, "to stand by") is the medical surgical specialty dealing with the care of a woman and her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (the period shortly after birth). Most obstetricians are also gynaecologists. Obstetrics and Gynaecology (often abbreviated to OB/GYN or O&G) form a single medical specialty. All gynecologists are trained obstetricians, and vice versa, having completed postgraduate medical training and residency programs. OB/GYN specialists work to ensure that pregnancy culminates in the delivery of a healthy baby, without impairing the health of the mother

Midwives are trained to recognize and deal with deviations from the norm during the term of pregnancy and during the birth and refer to obstetricians when a woman requires care beyond the areas of the midwife’s expertise. In many cases, these professions work together to provide all necessary care to childbearing women and their families. The midwife and the OB/GYN have a crucial role in health counseling and education, not only for the woman, but also within the family and community. They offer education involving antenatal education and preparation for parenthood and may extend to women's health, sexual or reproductive health and childcare

A healthy pregnancy leading to a healthy birth is the first gateway to a life of opportunity and a crucial time for the newborn to embody a sense of acceptance and fulfillment- physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. The cultural values, personal preferences of the women and families in their care, honoring the delicate choice of home birth, birthing center or hospital birth and to what extent medical intervention is appropriate are all of paramount importance in holistically honoring every birth experience as the precious foundation of one’s entire life experience

Healing Modalities within Child Bearing & Pedagogy

  • Doula
  • Midwifery
  • Pediatric Craniosacral Therapy
  • Holistic Childbirth
  • OBGYN
  • Pre & Post-Natal Yoga
  • Holistic Pedagogy
  • Pediatrics
  • Pregnancy Massage
  • Infant Massage

Licensure

No medical or professional license required.


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